ジャーナリスト安田純平さん、シリアで行方不明!Journalist Jyumpei Yasuda Missing in Syria


The article on Japanese journalist Jyumpei Yasuda who has been allegedly held hostage in Syria was withdrawn by Reporters Without Borders 6 days later.



However, the original article was covered only by a limited media in Japan such as Mainichi (Mr. Yasuda was formerly a newspaper journalist at Shinano Mainichi Newspaper) and strangely, the withdrawal of the original article was covered widely including NHK, Nikkei, etc...


In addition, the Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary, Suga commented, "Japanese government has been dealing with this issue at its best," but looking back the incident of Kenji Goto, it is quite a worrysome situation.  In this regard, I believe that the mere fact that Reporters without Borders covered the issue of Jyumpei Yasuda was meaningful.  I truly hope for the safe return of Jyumpei Yasuda.

RSF withdraws press release about Jumpei Yasuda

Published on Monday 28 December 2015.
Reporters Without Borders (RSF) issued a press release on 22 December about Jumpei Yasuda, a Japanese journalist held hostage in Syria since July. The release was not drafted according to normal procedure and was not sufficiently verified. It has therefore been withdrawn pending fuller information. We ask Yasuda’s family and friends, and the families of other hostages in Syria, to accept our apologies.


Japanese journalist in danger, RSF calls for his immediate release


Published on Tuesday 22 December 2015.
Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the Japanese government to do everything possible to obtain the release of Jumpei Yasuda, a Japanese freelance journalist who was kidnapped in Syria in July and who is still being held hostage by an armed group.


According to the information obtained yesterday by RSF, those holding Yasuda have started a countdown for the payment of a ransom, failing which they are threatening to execute him or sell him to another terrorist group.


Yasuda was kidnapped by an armed group in an area controlled by the Al-Nusra Front a few hours after crossing the border into Syria in early July. The stories he had wanted to cover included Islamic State’s execution of his friend and fellow Japanese journalist Kenji Goto in January.


RSF urges the Japanese government to act quickly. According to their obligations under international law – the Geneva Conventions and their additional protocols, UN Security Council Resolution 1738 on the safety of journalists (adopted in 2006) and a UN General Assembly resolution in 2013 – governments are responsible for the safety of journalists and must take active measures to protect and free them.


We are very concerned about Jumpei Yasuda’s fate and we call on the Japanese government to do what is needed to save this journalist,” said Benjamin Ismaïl, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “We also urge all parties to this conflict to respect the media’s work and to stop taking journalists hostage for political or financial purposes.

国境なき記者団のアジア太平洋地域デスク長であるBenjamin Ismail氏は述べる

A total of 54 journalists are currently held hostage worldwide, 26 of them in Syria. The world’s most dangerous country for media personnel, Syria is ranked 177th out of 180 countries in the 2015 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.